• deaconanthony@stmarymagdalen.net

The Solemnity of the Holy Trinity

Book of Deuteronomy 4:32-34, 39-40, Psalm 33, Romans 8:14-17, &

Matthew 28:16-20



Today the Church celebrates the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity. The One True God who reveals Himself to us as Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit. Our Church has been celebrating this solemnity since the 10th century. Interestingly, the design of the Trinity is not explained in Sacred Scripture; however, it is implicitly stated on many occasions.


The early Church found that it could not speak of God without speaking of the three ways in which He had revealed Himself to them. They discerned that there were not three Gods but the One True God. Each of the three persons in the 'Godhead' possesses eternal and infinite divine nature; thus, they are the one true God in essence, not "three Gods." Yet, they are indeed distinct in their relations to each other.


In one of his writings, Saint Pope John Paul II, concerning the subject of the Trinity stated, "We say that 1+1+1=3. But if we put a mathematical equation to the Blessed Trinity, it is like this, 1+1+1=1. The law of mathematics here could not be applied. In other words, we believe that God is one nature but three persons, but the full meaning of these words is far beyond our poor comprehension. However, the Trinity is a unique model and a sign of harmonious unity— a unity God expects to see in the daily lives of His children."


Moses explained, in our first reading, to his people that the God they worship breaks all stereotypes. Meaning that although God is the Creator, He cares enough about His people to speak with them. Remember, the "burning bush?" Another example is in the many verses from the Book of Psalm when we hear of God's expression of His kindness. He wants to preserve His people even in the midst of tragedies such as famine and war. Today, in Psalm 33, we hear, "Blessed are the people the Lord has chosen to be His own."


The Gospel narrative of Saint Matthew goes even further. He considers us His sons and daughters. He gives us His Spirit. Therefore, we are never treated like slaves but as adopted children who can talk to God like a child speaks to a father. Even better, since we are the children of God, we are His heirs as well. God the Father has prepared an inheritance for us. We share this inheritance with Jesus, the begotten Son of God.


We cannot know or fully understand everything there is about the Triune God. However, think back to when your parents lifted your hand to the holy water in your parish's font and dipped your fingers in the water, and taught you how to bless yourself in the 'Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.' Remember, too, how you taught your children.


The Sign of the Cross is a form of our devotion to the Blessed Trinity. We begin by touching our forehead to affirm that the Father is the First Person and the Godhead. At the words, "and of the Son," we touch our breast or heart to signify that the Son of God came down from heaven and became man. Lastly, by touching our left and right shoulders, we profess that the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father and the Son as from one source. We make it from the left to the right to express that the Cross of Christ removed us from the left side of sin to the right side of holiness and salvation. We finish blessing ourselves with the word "Amen," which means, "So be it," as we acknowledge that we believe in the Holy Trinity and of our redemption.


Therefore, 1+1+1 does indeed equal 1.


Question of the Day: Will you begin and end each day with the Sign of the Cross to remind yourself that there are Three Persons in the Blessed Trinity?


Prayer: Glory to the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit; to God who is, who was, and who is to come. Amen.


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